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Independent analysis shows decline in Illinois’ COVID-19 case fatality rate

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Friday, November 13, 2020  |  Article  |  By Greg Bishop | The Center Square

Governor (44) , Health (49)

Numbers show focus should be on nursing homes, increasing hospital capacity, Wirepoints says

(The Center Square) – Illinois’ COVID-19 fatality rate has plummeted, according to an analysis by Wirepoints, but there’s still signs policies are failing where help is needed most.

Wirepoints President Ted Dabrowski’s team crunched the numbers from three months early in the pandemic and found the case fatality rate was just under 5 percent. From the last three months, the case fatality rate is 0.9 percent.

“As a public, we’re running scared because all we hear is this massive increase of cases,” Dabrowski said. “You’ll never hear the governor talk about how the fatality rate has collapsed, and that’s an important thing for people to know.”

He said it’s clear the virus isn’t deadly in younger people, but can be very dangerous for people over 60. And one thing the data shows is where the state continues to fail.

“We’re eight months into this pandemic,” Dabrowski said. “We know where the elderly live. We know those retirement homes where they are. In the month of September and part of November, 44 percent of all deaths were in retirement homes and that’s a shocking statistic.”

Dabrowski said even of the spike in COVID-19 related deaths reported Wednesday, 127 of 145 most were 60 and older.

The data also shows Dabrowski the state needs to focus more on protecting the elderly as nearly half of the deaths continue to be at nursing homes.

“What I think the best money would be spent is to open up the economy, opening up the schools and taking lots of money and protecting the retirement homes, like I said, we know where they are, we know where they live, they need to be protected,” he said.

Another note he highlights is despite knowing the need, the state hasn’t increased the number of hospital beds since June.

“I think we shouldn't be surprised that our hospitals are being strained because we’ve done nothing about that despite the fact that we know as we open the economy we’re susceptible to more cases, more hospitalizations,” he said.